Commentary

Wed
20
Apr

Traffic congestion on US 281 needs to be addressed

By LEW K. COHN

The Highlander

Managing Editor

I listened with interest to the presentation last week on the City of Marble Falls' comprehensive plan, which has been updated through the work of Halff Associates along with the City Council, Economic Development Committee and a Comprehensive Plan Action Committee (CPAC).

One of the more interesting topics which came up as Robert Halff presented the plan was traffic and transportation through Marble Falls, especially on the U.S. Highway 281 corridor. I was especially encouraged when I heard discussion about the possible development of alternate routes to US 281.

Fri
15
Apr

Backpacking in the Big Bend

BY ALEXANDRIA RANDOLPH/BURNET BULLETIN

My feet hurt. My ankles hurt. My legs hurt. My back hurts; and I have the biggest grin on my face today. I'll share why.

Yesterday I made the long trip home after a backpacking excursion in Big Bend National Park. I had long desired to visit Big Bend because of all the stories I had heard of it's beauty. After a week of scrambling to ensure we had the right gear, enough water, and my wonderful boyfriend pulling his hair out over mapping out all our possible itinerary, we were on the road by 7 a.m. on a Thursday morning for our eight hour drive to the western border of Texas.

Mon
11
Apr

Her name was Haruka and she deserved better than to die

Haruka Weiser

BY LEW K. COHN, MANAGING EDITOR
HIGHLAND LAKES NEWSPAPERS
Her name was Haruka and she decided to study at the University of Texas at Austin because it offered her the opportunity to do what she always wanted to do – dance – while she contemplated a second major in pre-med.
Her name was Haruka and she had been a beautiful, lithe ballet dancer from Portland, Ore., who was well-liked and admired by her classmates and professors and seen as an outstanding talent by those who took the stage with her as part of Dance Action, a student-run dance organization.
Her name was Haruka and she had been recruited to the University of Texas more than two years prior, when faculty members from the university saw her perform at the National High School Dance Festival and caught their eye. She seemed to be a perfect fit for the close-knit program, which has only about 60 members.
Wed
06
Apr

69 Club is the new 27 Club among celebrities

Human beings have a preoccupation with death which has dated back to the earliest of our ancestors. As a species, we try to come to grips with our own mortality by trying to make sense of it any way we can. One such way is by recognizing patterns in the demise of others, especially celebrities, whose lives seem to shine brighter than our own, and in some cases, burn up faster as well.

It has been well documented that a great number of creative artists, whether musicians or singers or even those dedicated to the visual arts, seem to shuffle off their mortal coil on or after their 27th birthday but before their 28th. Known as the “27 Club,” its roster of members read like a Who’s Who of the afterlife.

Wed
30
Mar

Hill Country folk are welcoming to new managing editor

By Lew K Cohn, Managing Editor, Highland Lakes Newspapers

 

It has been nearly 20 years since I lived in the Texas Hill Country, having formerly worked as a managing editor in Bandera in the late 1990s. When I left to take a similar assignment at a newspaper in Northeast Texas, I never imagined I would get the opportunity to return … until now.

 

I love the Hill Country. There is something majestic, something awe-inspiring about being out in what I call “God's Country.” The scenic bluffside vistas, dazzling lakes and rolling, bluebonnet-covered landscapes make me feel like I am in heaven.

Wed
16
Mar

Full 5th Circuit to hear Texas voter ID case

The entire U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals will review Texas’ controversial voter identification law.

A majority of the judges of the Fifth Circuit on March 9 voted in support of an “en banc” rehearing of oral arguments in Veasey v. Abbott, a case challenging the law. No date for the rehearing has been set.

The case stems from Senate Bill 14, a law passed by the Texas Legislature in 2011, which requires prospective voters to present an acceptable form of photo identification along with their voter registration card in order to cast a ballot.

Wed
16
Mar

This Week in Texas History

U.S. Navy caught running guns to Santa Anna

 

While on patrol off the Mexican coast on Mar. 20, 1836, the Invincible vanquished an enemy man-of-war and seized an American blockade runner on the high seas. It was all in a day’s work for the Texas Navy.

 

Tue
15
Mar

Thanks to farmers, ranchers

National Agriculture Day, farmers, ranchers

Photo by Mark Goodson/The Highlander
Longhorns graze on ranchland near the Llano Slab Road.

Today, Tuesday, March 15, is the day to say thank you to all our farmers and ranchers. It is National Agriculture Day.

“This is the day folks across the country gather to recognize and celebrate the great accomplishments of American agriculture, said Val Dolcini, administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency. “This year’s theme is 'American Agriculture: Stewards of a Healthy Planet'.”

“For me, it brings to mind the important environmental achievements of farmers and ranchers enrolled in FSA’s conservation reserve program,” Dolcini continued. “For over 30 years, these dedicated stewards of the land have worked hard to maintain and improve the soil and natural resources passed on to future generations.

Fri
11
Mar

What makes someone a Texas barbecue aficionado?

What’s the best barbecue “joint” in Texas? (I’m a language purist and won’t use bar-b-q unless it’s part of the establishment’s name.)

 

Of course, I don’t have the answer. Thousands of Lone Star wannabe aficionados do not either. I can state one thing with a certainty: Texas barbecue beats Louisiana’s version all hollow. 

 

Fri
11
Mar

This Week in Texas History

Bartee Haile, This Week in Texas History

Disgraced politician tries to settle the score

 

Mar. 14, 1882, was the date and the Dallas County Courthouse was the place a former mayor of three Texas towns chose to have it out with the man he blamed for his latest fall from political grace.

 

It was no coincidence that James Thurmond went out west in the late 1850s. Like other youths of draft age, the Kentucky native wanted to put as many miles as possible between him and the soon-to-come Civil War.

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