Commentary

 

 

Wed
16
Mar

Full 5th Circuit to hear Texas voter ID case

The entire U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals will review Texas’ controversial voter identification law.

A majority of the judges of the Fifth Circuit on March 9 voted in support of an “en banc” rehearing of oral arguments in Veasey v. Abbott, a case challenging the law. No date for the rehearing has been set.

The case stems from Senate Bill 14, a law passed by the Texas Legislature in 2011, which requires prospective voters to present an acceptable form of photo identification along with their voter registration card in order to cast a ballot.

Wed
16
Mar

This Week in Texas History

U.S. Navy caught running guns to Santa Anna

 

While on patrol off the Mexican coast on Mar. 20, 1836, the Invincible vanquished an enemy man-of-war and seized an American blockade runner on the high seas. It was all in a day’s work for the Texas Navy.

 

Tue
15
Mar

Thanks to farmers, ranchers

National Agriculture Day, farmers, ranchers

Photo by Mark Goodson/The Highlander
Longhorns graze on ranchland near the Llano Slab Road.

Today, Tuesday, March 15, is the day to say thank you to all our farmers and ranchers. It is National Agriculture Day.

“This is the day folks across the country gather to recognize and celebrate the great accomplishments of American agriculture, said Val Dolcini, administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency. “This year’s theme is 'American Agriculture: Stewards of a Healthy Planet'.”

“For me, it brings to mind the important environmental achievements of farmers and ranchers enrolled in FSA’s conservation reserve program,” Dolcini continued. “For over 30 years, these dedicated stewards of the land have worked hard to maintain and improve the soil and natural resources passed on to future generations.

Fri
11
Mar

What makes someone a Texas barbecue aficionado?

What’s the best barbecue “joint” in Texas? (I’m a language purist and won’t use bar-b-q unless it’s part of the establishment’s name.)

 

Of course, I don’t have the answer. Thousands of Lone Star wannabe aficionados do not either. I can state one thing with a certainty: Texas barbecue beats Louisiana’s version all hollow. 

 

Fri
11
Mar

This Week in Texas History

Bartee Haile, This Week in Texas History

Disgraced politician tries to settle the score

 

Mar. 14, 1882, was the date and the Dallas County Courthouse was the place a former mayor of three Texas towns chose to have it out with the man he blamed for his latest fall from political grace.

 

It was no coincidence that James Thurmond went out west in the late 1850s. Like other youths of draft age, the Kentucky native wanted to put as many miles as possible between him and the soon-to-come Civil War.

Fri
11
Mar

Cruz, Clinton emerge as winners in Texas primary elections on March 1

By Ed Sterling,
Texas Press Association

March 1 Super Tuesday election returns posted by the Texas Secretary of State’s Elections Division show 2.8 million (about 20 percent) of the state’s 14.2 million registered voters cast a ballot in the Republican Party Presidential Primary.

In the Democratic Party Presidential Primary, the statewide turnout was 1.4 million, or about 10 percent of the state’s registered voters.

Sun
21
Feb

This Week in Texas History

Marine from South Texas raised Iwo Jima flag

 

A young marine from South Texas was one of six American fighting men caught on camera on Feb. 23, 1945, raising the Stars and Stripes on a Pacific battlefield called Iwo Jima.

Harlon Henry Block was born in 1924 at Yorktown and grew up on 40 acres in the Rio Grande Valley. The third of six children, he had one sister and four brothers.

Sun
21
Feb

Supreme Court halts EPA pollution abatement rule

By Ed Sterling,  Texas Press Association

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on Feb. 9 heralded the U.S. Supreme Court’s 5-4 order that put on hold a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule requiring power producers to cut back on the release of pollutants emitted mainly from coal-burning operations.

Sun
21
Feb

Sweet slumber startled by seriously stirred-up Sawyer

By Wills Webb

 

Being awakened at 3 a.m. by a snoring dog is not conducive to kind thoughts about an otherwise beloved little animal.

There are a number of reasons I long ago abandoned my lifelong edict of No Dog Will Ever Sleep in My Bed! You can’t issue that declaration to cats because they will slip under the covers and bite your toes in revenge.

Fri
08
Jan

Texas sues EPA over new ozone standards

The State of Texas and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality on Dec. 23 filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over its new ozone standards rule.

Eight other states have filed separate lawsuits against the new rule: Arizona, Arkansas, Kentucky, New Mexico, Oklahoma, North Dakota, Utah and Wisconsin.

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