Features

Wed
18
Oct

Elk hunting takes a team

Contributed/Hunter Burnham

Hunter Burnham, heir to a tradition of Hill Country hunting, displays a majestic herd bull was approximately eight years old.He says it took a team working in unison to bring him down. Read much more of interest to hunters in the 2017 Hunters' Guide inside the Tuesday, Oct. 17, edition of The Highlander.

Highland Lakes natives and tourists with long memories remember the Burnham Brothers sporting goods store, once found on Avenue H across from the Blue Bonnet Cafe, if only for its window full of rattlesnakes. It was owned by Winston and Murry Burnham, who parlayed the hunting and game calling expertise handed down by their father, J. Morton Burnham, into a successful business of national repute.

In 1961 Roy Rogers invited them to Los Angeles to teach him to hunt and call predators. Their quick success with him led to hunts all over the world. Many thousands of hunters have relied on the game and predator calls they developed.

Fri
13
Oct

Engineer notes 'fugitive dusts' as rock plant concern

By Lew K. Cohn

Managing Editor

The Highlander

A former Marble Falls mine safety engineer has warned members of a group fighting a proposed rock crushing plant of the dangers of “fugitive dusts” that will escape the facility if an air quality permit is approved by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, stating the plant should have been required to perform “air dispersion modeling” due to the proximity of Baylor Scott & White Marble Falls hospital.

Tue
03
Oct

Former astronaut tells kids, 'reach for the stars'

Lew K. Cohn/The Highlander

Magnolia and Zellam Payson try on austronaut helmets at the annual Hill Country Space Expo at the Marble Falls Boys & Girls Club Saturday, Sept. 30. The two five-year-olds attended with their mother Kathy Payson to meet former NASA austronaut Capt. Dan Bursch and learn about a path to the stars.

By Lew K. Cohn

Managing Editor

The Highlander

Former NASA astronaut Capt. Dan Bursch knows how important science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education is for the next generation and is glad to see events like the Hill Country Space Expo bringing exhibits and artifacts to kids.

“I think the most important thing for kids right now is getting them interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics,” Bursch said. “Events like these are dealing with real people, real hardware and real stories.

Tue
26
Sep

Library Friends: A thrift store-y

Virginia Cervantez, pictured here in the home and decor section of the Marble Falls Library Thrift Store, has been manager of the operation for the non-profit Friends of the Marble Falls Library for 21 years. As part of the 20th Anniversary of the Marble Falls Public Library building at 101 Main Street, all the volunteers and staff of the store that helped build the modern library and continue its success will be honored with a tea on Thursday, Oct. 5, sponsored by Friends of the Marble Falls Library. See pictures of some of the volunteers hard at work on the Facebook page of The Highlander.

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

At 6:30 a.m., when some are just sitting down to breakfast, the Marble Falls Library Thrift Store is buzzing with activity.

Volunteers from Friends of the Marble Falls Library are sorting donations, repairing items and stocking the store at 300 Avenue J. When the doors open at 9:30 a.m., shoppers know they will always find something new-to-them, from clothing and jewelry to furniture and home accessories. The children's area includes an amazing offering of dolls and toys and, of course because readers take a special interesting in supporting the store, there are books, videos and audio selections.

Sales are so brisk the Friends are able to direct about $10,000 a month to the Marble Falls Public Library, now celebrating a Platinum Anniversary at the 101 Main Street facility that Friends helped to build 20 years ago.

Fri
22
Sep

Librarians + children = lifetime readers

Glynis Crawford Smith/The Highlander

On hand to greet all the visitors to the 20th Anniversary of the Marble Falls Library on 101 Main Street are full-time staff members, from left, Karen Davis, assistant director; Mary Seaman, Brittany Cavness, Misty Smith and Amanda Rose, director. See a schedule of events at the end of this story.

 

 

 

 

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

The very first day of events for the 20th Anniversary of the Marble Falls Library on Main Street, Monday, Oct. 2, will be Children's Day, but then, every day is children's day in a library.

In fact, when former librarians are honored on with an invitation-only luncheon on Tuesday, Oct. 3, school librarians are included in the kudos and at least one among them learned to love books under their care.

“I didn't know I would grow up to be a librarian, I just loved to go to the library,” said Amanda Rose, current director of the Marble Falls Library. My best friend and I would get dropped off there and we loved spending hours reading.”

Fri
22
Sep

Library Anniversary pays tribute to founder

Lois Anderson ~ June 14, 1884-April, 29,1956

 

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

In celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Marble Falls Library at 101 Main Street, organizers will be looking even farther back in history almost 70 years.

During a whole week of events, Oct. 1-7, visitors will pass a picture of Mrs. H.R. (Lois) Anderson (June 14, 1884-April, 29,1956).

The year 1948 was is the date historical accounts credit as the beginning of one woman with pushing forward a dream of a library in Marble Falls.

Anderson had already been rallying support with the local Parent Teacher Association when plans were announced that year by the Burnet County Library Board of Directors to incorporate branches in Marble Falls, Bertram and Briggs. The news that PTA, Federated Clubs and Home Demonstration Clubs would get behind the idea of donating books, set Anderson on a search for a location.

Sat
16
Sep

Alliance joins forces to eliminate hunger

Glynis Crawford Smith/The Highlander

Kathy Savage, left, the Highland Lakes Service League (HLSL) liaison to the Marble Falls Helping Center delivers food for the Marble Falls Helping Center to volunteer Barbara King. Monthly donations from churches and service organizations help keep the shelves stocked for some 1,700 people in need.

The Burnet County Commissioners Court, joined by the Burnet County Hunger Alliance (BCHA), proclaimed September as Hunger Awareness Month during the Tuesday, Sept. 12 court meeting.

The BCHA is a volunteer group of food pantries, churches, school administrators, elected officials, area leaders and active citizens committed to ending hunger in Burnet County. The Alliance provides a forum to build relationships and communication for working together to comprehensively feed the hungry in Burnet County.

Fri
08
Sep

Strickland honored on Airsho poster

World War II naval aviator and retired Presbyterian minister J. Arthur (Art) Strickland was honored with his likeness on the official poster for the 26th anniversary Confederate Air Force Highland Lakes Airsho, held Saturday, Sept. 9, at Burnet Municipal Airport's Kate Craddock Field.

Strickland obtained his private pilot's license while at Schreiner Institute in Kerville and enrolled in the U.S. Navy V-5 program as a naval aviation cadet in November 1942. He attended pre-flight school at the University of Georgia and primary flight training in Millington, Tennessee, prior to being assigned to the Naval Air Station at Pensacola, Florida. On Nov. 30, 1943, he received his wings as a naval aviator and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps Reserves.

Thu
31
Aug

Harvey refugees harbor in Highland Lakes

Glynis Crawford Smith/The Highlander

At a lunch provided by First Baptist Church – Burnet, Swanna Lofton, center, explains resources her congregation has been assembling for refugees such as the family of Glenna Roberts, with whom she is seated. Grandchildren and great-grandchildren of the Rockport family seated with them are, from left, Skyla, Kimberlynn and Ray Jr. Jasso and Baille Phillips. Mid-day has been set as a meeting time with local churches and organizations delivering help to storm victims at Inks Lake State Park.

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

Estimates have more than 30,000 Texans seeking emergency shelter as the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey continues, but many are safe and dry in the Texas Hill Country.

Mission Marble Falls at St. Frederick Church geared up for a lunch Tuesday, Aug. 29, to welcome people fleeing the storm.

Ann Sherman and Ron Farmer had traveled from Port Aransas.

“When they said Harvey would come as a Category 1, we were going to stay,” said Sherman. “Then they said Category 3 or maybe 4.

“Ron said we are going. We grabbed our cat, our records, our pictures and we got out in 45 minutes.”

A few people stayed behind and the couple said the news was disheartening.

“The roof is gone and the ceiling is on the floor,” he said.

Two groups of people from Sweeney who had never met were lunching in the St. Frederick dining room.

Wed
16
Aug

Living Love shelter makes Plus Ten Puppies appeal

Contributed

Living Love Animal Rescue, already bursting with cats and dogs looking for new homes, has taken on most of a 14-puppy litter and now a fund has been established to care for them until the Lab-mix heart melters can find homes. The Clear the Shelters campaign is in full swing and adoptions now could help answer that call.

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

The volunteers of Living Love Animal Rescue in south Burnet County went above and beyond their previous commitments this month when they made room for more than 10 animals at once.

The shelter already was full to bursting with 20 dogs and close to 100 cats. A recording at the shelter already announced that the shelter was full when a call came in that set a new challenge.

A woman in tears said her dog had delivered 14 pups and she had no resources to care for them.

Shelter manager Rosalie Brosh and volunteer Kelley Whited traveled to the woman's home thinking they might come away with two puppies and an agreement to have the mother dog spayed.

"We asked to see the pups and the lady brought out a pan of food to draw them out and out they came, covered in fleas and sores,” said Brosh. “There were 10, and it was clear that there was no hope

whatsoever for these poor babies.

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