Inks Lake State Park

Tue
31
Jul

Evacuees returning to homes after fire

Contributed/Burnet County ESD Commissioner Clayton Smith
A lone individual with a water hose is doing his best to help fight the County Road 116/Park Road 4 fire as flames rise on a nearby ridge. Some 557 acres have burned and the fire is 60 percent contained as of Tuesday morning.

 

 

 

 

By Savanna Gregg

The Highlander

Texas A&M Forest Service (TFS) officials were hopeful residents evacuated from Park Road 4 and County Road 116 (Hoover Valley Road) due to fire would be allowed to return to their homes at 5 p.m. Tuesday, July 31.

More than 50 local personnel from 17 different departments have responded to a blaze which consumed 557 acres, forced evacuations of residents from 150 homes and closed the two major roads as well as Inks Lake State Park.

Fortunately, no one has been killed or injured and no homes have been reported damaged from the grass fire, which began at about 2:52 p.m. Sunday, July 29, along County Road 116, better known as Hoover Valley Road, near Park Road 4, close to Inks Lake State Park, and quickly escalated to yet another raging wildfire for Burnet County.

Thu
31
Aug

Harvey refugees harbor in Highland Lakes

Glynis Crawford Smith/The Highlander

At a lunch provided by First Baptist Church – Burnet, Swanna Lofton, center, explains resources her congregation has been assembling for refugees such as the family of Glenna Roberts, with whom she is seated. Grandchildren and great-grandchildren of the Rockport family seated with them are, from left, Skyla, Kimberlynn and Ray Jr. Jasso and Baille Phillips. Mid-day has been set as a meeting time with local churches and organizations delivering help to storm victims at Inks Lake State Park.

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

Estimates have more than 30,000 Texans seeking emergency shelter as the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey continues, but many are safe and dry in the Texas Hill Country.

Mission Marble Falls at St. Frederick Church geared up for a lunch Tuesday, Aug. 29, to welcome people fleeing the storm.

Ann Sherman and Ron Farmer had traveled from Port Aransas.

“When they said Harvey would come as a Category 1, we were going to stay,” said Sherman. “Then they said Category 3 or maybe 4.

“Ron said we are going. We grabbed our cat, our records, our pictures and we got out in 45 minutes.”

A few people stayed behind and the couple said the news was disheartening.

“The roof is gone and the ceiling is on the floor,” he said.

Two groups of people from Sweeney who had never met were lunching in the St. Frederick dining room.

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