tax rate

Fri
18
Aug

Marble Falls Council puts forward $32 million budget, lower tax rate, fee breaks for most

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

Public hearings Tuesday, Aug. 15, unveiled a final proposed budget based on a tax rate slightly lower than the effective rate and including proposed utility fee increases lower than anticipated for Fiscal Year 2017-2018 in the City of Marble Falls.

Finance Director Margie Cardenas presented a budget for programs and services of $32 million with general fund expenditures of $10.404 million.

According to the council decision Aug. 1, Cardenas and her staff based the budget on an ad valorem tax rate of .6340, or 63.4 cents per $100,000, lower than the current rate of .6483. Nonetheless, the rate will apply to a certified tax valuation that has risen about eight percent to $726 million for an increase.

Fri
11
Aug

Granite Shoals Council fighting financial fire

Glynis Crawford Smith/The Highlander

Caught doing something good: Granite Shoals City Council Member Anita Hisey, right, was spotted picking up litter on Phillips Ranch Road recently by former Mayor Dennis Maier, left. Calling himself a "self-appointed committee of one," surprised her at the Tuesday night, Aug. 8, council meeting with an impromptu "Trash Picker-Upper" award, a long-handled grabber to help with any future impulse to clean up what "inconsiderate litterers" leave behind.

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

The Granite Shoals City Council has faced a challenging year of unknowns surrounding costs of road repair, but another issue fanning the flames of financial woes has been rising fire department costs.

At their meeting Tuesday, Aug. 8, it was clear council members and staff consider a new stream of financial support from surrounding communities the only remedy.

Granite Shoals Fire Rescue provides fire protection for the adjacent City of Highland Haven and the large, outlying rural communities of Burnet County Emergency Service District #3 (ESD3), each looking at the end of a contract for services that ends Sept. 30.

“My view is, they need to pay their fair share,” said City Manager Ken Nickel, looking specifically at ESD3. “They collect 7.5 cents per $100,000 valuation from their property owners. They have a fund balance of $400,000.

Tue
08
Aug

CWS in 30th year presents Holloway Citizen Award

Glynis Crawford Smith/The Highlander

In a fitting 30th Anniversary benchmark, the City of Cottonwood Shores Citizen of the Year Award is presented by Mayor Donald Orr, left, to Rex Holloway at a city council meeting Thursday, Aug. 3. The seal of the city behind them proclaims Aug. 8, 1987 as the date of incorporation.

Council proposes tax rate, discusses deer ordinance

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

Rex Holloway can now say he received the Cottonwood Shores Citizen of the Year Award on the city's 30th Anniversary.

Cottonwood Shores incorporated Aug. 8, 1987, but only in the last three years has it begun honoring the volunteers who have done much of the work to keep improving the city.

In Holloway's case, that includes serves on the city's Board of Adjustment and as vice chairman of the Parks Committee.

“He has worked tirelessly for new playground equipment, and the addition of the splash pad and Memorial Day's grand opening with hotdogs and tee shirts for the kids,” said City Administrator Sheila Moore. “He also attends most city council meetings.”

Mon
07
Aug

Marble Falls council pinches pennies toward $10 million budget, okays zoning for Zeecon

From Marble Falls zoning request

An architectural drawing depicts a new office proposed for Zeecon Wireless Internet offices at 500 Main Street. The city council approved a zoning change for the property.

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

The Marble Falls City voted to propose a fraction-smaller rate than recommended by city staff for a reduction of $1,260 in property tax income in the Fiscal Year 2017-2018.

The new rate and a proposed budget of approximately $10.1 million will have a public hearing Aug. 15 and possible adoption Sept. 5.

Unlike most cities, Marble Falls is a city of public works driven by its economic engine. Sales tax makes up about 60 percent of income and property tax, about 20 percent. Money from bonds, grants, utilities and fees form most of the remaining income.

Staff had proposed adoption of the effective tax rate, a rate lower than the current rate that equaled the same income as the last. The current rate is 0.6483 (64.83 cents) per $100 valuation. The effective rate would be 0.6341 (63.41 cents) per $100 and the proposed rate chosen was 0.6340 (63.40 cents) per $100.

Fri
23
Sep

Horseshoe Bay City Council approves slight property tax increase to 26 cents

Melissa Kanz/The Highlander

Teresa Moore accepts a plaque from Mayor Steve Jordan to thank her for her excellent service to the City of Horseshoe Bay. Moore will retire Sept. 30. Jordan also declared Sept. 26-30 to be Teresa Moore Week.

 

By Melissa Kanz

The Highlander

Horseshoe Bay residents will see a slight increase on their property taxes after city council members voted to increase the tax to offset utility costs. Members also approved the 2017 budget.

Increasing from $0.25 per $100 valuation to $0.26 per $100 valuation, the city is expected to use the funds exclusively for its rate stabilization fund, which will then be used to offset some of the utility increase.

“This is something council has been considering. The issue was what we have and what we need to balance the budget. It was inevitable that it could be greater,” Horseshoe Bay Mayor Steve Jordan said.

The increase comes after council members were advised there would be around 9 percent increase in utilities to include water and wastewater.

Tue
30
Aug

Marble Falls ISD adopts same tax rate for fifth year running

By Lew K. Cohn

Managing Editor

The Highlander

Depending on the value of their property, Marble Falls Independent School District taxpayers may see their individual taxes increase for the 2016-2017 school year, but they will be paying the same tax rate they have for the past several years.

MFISD trustees voted 5-0 on Monday, Aug. 29, to set a maintenance and operations tax rate of $1.0533 per $100 valuation and an interest and sinking tax rate of 22.67 cents per $100 valuation for a total tax rate of $1.28. It is the fifth year in a row the district has set its tax rate at $1.28 per $100 valuation.

School board members also approved an additional $1,123,595 in revenue and expenditures for the fiscal 2017 budget after learning that property values for the district had come in higher than expected.

Mon
29
Aug

County lowers 2017 tax rate 1.4 percent

Alexandria Randolph
Highland Lakes Newspapers
Burnet County Commissioners Court officially decreased the ad valorem tax rate for the second fiscal year in a row.
Commissioners Court met on Tuesday, Aug. 23 and approved an effective tax rate for the 2017 fiscal year that is a 1.4 percent reduction compared to last year’s rate.
Burnet County Judge James Oakley said the new rate, which is .3969 per $100 valuation, will amount to a $369.90 tax per year for a property valued at $100,000.
For those residents whose property values didn’t rise this year, the new tax will represent a 1.4 percent reduction in their county taxes.
The lower effective rate is the “culmination of rising property values in the county,” Oakley said.
“It would have been a lot lower this year, but we had a lot more seniors qualify for the tax freeze.”

Wed
24
Aug

Ridgemont Village gets Community Pride Award, council hears budget, tax rate

GLYNIS CRAWFORD SMITH/THE HIGHLANDER

The first annual Community Pride Award is presented to Ridgemont Village for spring cleaning beautification within the city. Mayor John Packer is joined for the presentation at the Marble Falls City Council meeting Aug. 16 by, continuing left, Scott Matthews, Ridgemont Village owner; resident Dee Guinn, and Kelly Crane, Ridgemont Village manager.

By Glynis Crawford Smith

The Highlander

Ridgemont Village, a retirement community at 92 Gateway North, has been named recipient of the first annual Marble Falls Community Pride Award.

The award was first on the agenda of the Marble Falls City Council in a meeting Tuesday, Aug. 16, that included also the first public hearing on a budget and tax rate and an encouraging report on the city's relationship with Baylor Scott & White.

“I want to thank Ridgmont Village for taking part in this effort to enhance the appearanceof our community,” said Mayor John Packer in welcome to Scott and Gail Matthews, owners of the gated, hilltop development, and their manager Kelly Crane.

Crane introduced Adrian and Dee Guinn, saying “Dee was the one who read about the award in the newspaper and nominated us. The Guinns are representative of our residents who care about the place where they live.”

Tue
09
Aug

MF Council holds line on tax rate

GLYNIS CRAWFORD SMITH/THE HIGHLANDER
Members of the Marble Falls Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee are recognized for development of the new city plan at the Marble Falls City Council Meeting Tuesday, Aug. 2, are members receiving individual plaques from Mayor John Packer, second from left, are from left Mayor Pro Tem Jane Marie Hurst; William Haddock; Chairman Brian Shirley; Charles Watkins, and. Not pictured are former Council Member Richard Lewis; P&Z Commissioner Fred Zagst; Mark McCary and citizen and business representatives Jessica Cayce, Matt Fields, Chris Garza, Phil Hiser, John Kemper, Greg Ritchie, Jim Weber and Jane Knapik, PhD.

BY GLYNIS CRAWFORD SMITH

THE HIGHLANDER

The Marble Falls City Council on Tuesday, Sept. 2, voted to hold the line on the ad valorem tax rate.

They voted to maintain a rate of $0.6483 or 64.83 cents per $100,000 valuation.

“This proposal keeps the rate just under the effective rate,” said Finance Director Margie Cardenas. “That would have been .6485. The roll back rate would have been .6656. This will be our fifth year in a row to maintain the same tax rate. And, as you are adopting the same rate, two hearings are not required.

“Taxpayers will see no increase unless they have an increase in valuation.”

Cardenas noted that tax payers within the freeze category--65 years of age or older or handicapped--has continued to increase. Nonetheless, the total revenue expected from property taxes is $4,361,498.

Tue
09
Aug

Meadowlakes taxes inch down

BY GLYNIS CRAWFORD SMITH

THE HIGHLANDER

The Meadowlakes City Council meets next on Aug. 16, but most of their hard end-of-year is done, with the budget hearing and tax rate adoption not set until Sept. 20.

In a special session on July 27, the council adopted a proposed ad valorem tax rate for 2016 of $0.3186 per $100 valuation. That is about six-tenths of a percent less than last year's tax rate.

In her digital newsletter to citizens, Mayor Mary Ann Reasoner compared that decision to a similar choice in Marble Falls to propose continuing their rate, scraping just under the effective rate.

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